What is Lasik eye surgery?

What is Lasik eye surgery?

LASIK stands for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

LASIK eye surgery is used to correct the vision as it reduces the need for eyeglasses and contact lenses to correct the most common vision problems (e.g., nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism).

The procedure relies on the expertise of a surgeon who’s trained in the ophthalmic surgery.

Lasik eye surgery

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Iambiomed – Join Us

Iambiomed – Join Us

Join our team for the betterment of biomedical Engineering.

We would appreciate your participation in exploring biomedical field.

Be our representative in your colleges and help us reach your college to give biomedical students a larger vision towards this field.

You can help us by:

  • Providing exam papers
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  • Keeping all the updates in the field
  • Writing Blogs
  • Keeping us updated of any college festivals/events/seminars being conducted and spreading awareness about iambiomed in these events

 

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Role of Biomedical Sales Engineer

Role of Biomedical Sales Engineer

No one dreams about working as a sales engineer after graduating as a biomedical engineer, but with limited options available one may try his hand at this job.

Biomedical being such a huge industry and its product base being enormous the companies are in need for sales and marketing people. Many national and multi-national companies have set their base and there are distributors for the products of these companies, so the job opportunities are always available.

Having said this it is always better to work for a Parent company than for a distributor.

A dream job would be getting an opportunity to work for Draeger, Maquet, GE, Philips, Smiths Medical, Olympus.

List of 25 Dream companies every biomedical engineer wants to work for

biomedical sales engineer

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Indian doctor Harminder Dua finds new cornea layer

An Indian doctor in Britain has discovered a new layer in the human cornea that could help cure blindness due to glaucoma.

 

Harminder Dua from the University of Nottingham discovered that the layer -15 microns thick but incredibly tough— plays a vital role in the structure of the tissue that controls the flow of fluid from the eye.

 new cornea layer

The findings could shed new light on glaucoma, the devastating disease caused by defective drainage of fluid from the eye and the world’s second leading cause of blindness.

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New laparoscopic pressure sensors can make 3-D maps of tumours

New laparoscopic pressure sensors can make 3-D maps of tumours

During open surgery, doctors rely on their sense of touch to identify the edges of hidden tumours and to locate hidden blood vessels and other anatomical structures: a procedure they call palpation.

But during minimally invasive surgeries the ability to examine tissue through touch, called palpation, is lost. Instead, surgeons must manipulate the tissue with long, narrow instruments and rely on visual images from tiny cameras. But engineers in the United States, the United Kingdom, and elsewhere have designed new tools to help restore a surgeon’s sense of touch.

laparoscopic pressure sensors

The devices, dubbed palpation probes, are designed to be used laparoscopically and can detect changes in the stiffness of tissue. Tumours are harder than normal tissue, so they can be detected with a combination of pressure sensors and spatial positioning measurements. The readings are used to create a three-dimensional stiffness map that shows surgeons the margins of tumours.

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Google lens: option for diabetics

Google lens: option for diabetics 

Google has said it is testing a “smart contact lens” that can help measure glucose levels in tears.

It uses a “tiny” wireless chip and a “miniaturised” glucose sensor embedded between two layers of lens material.

Lens looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors. It’s ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wirelessly transmit them to a handheld device.

google lens

People suffering from the condition need to monitor their glucose levels regularly as sudden spikes or drops are dangerous. At present, the majority of them do so by testing drops of blood.

Google said it was testing a prototype of the lens that could “generate a reading once per second”.

The idea that all of that monitoring could be going on passively, through a contact lens, is especially promising for the world’s 382 million diabetics who need insulin and keep a close watch on their blood sugar.

Google said it was working with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to bring the product to mainstream use.

It added that it would look for partners “who are experts in bringing products like this to market”.

Before the smart contact lens becomes official, Google will also have to determine whether measuring tear fluid is actually relevant for blood sugar levels.

Artificial heart implanted in France

Artificial heart implanted in France

For the first time, a bioprosthetic heart that may give patients up to five years of extra life has been successfully implanted in a 75-year-old French man.

The procedure was performed on December 18th at France’s Georges Pompidou European Hospital, and the patient is said to be doing well.

The artificial heart, designed by French biomedical firm Carmat, is powered by Lithium-ion batteries that can be worn externally.

The artificial heart, designed by French biomedical firm Carmat, is powered by Lithium-ion batteries that can be worn externally.

The artificial heart, designed by French biomedical firm Carmat, is powered by Lithium-ion batteries that can be worn externally.

The heart that was put into the patient uses a range of “bio-materials”, including bovine tissue, to reduce the likelihood of the body rejecting it, ‘The Telegraph’ reported.

This device is intended to replace a real heart for as many as five years, unlike previous artificial hearts that were created mainly for temporary use.

Carmat’s artificial heart is three times heavier than an average healthy human heart.

The patient is currently awake in the intensive care unit and is speaking with family members.

“We are delighted with this first implant, although it is premature to draw conclusions given that a single implant has been performed and that we are in the early post-operative phase,” Marcello Conviti, the chief executive of Carmat, said.

The device mimics heart muscle contractions and contains sensors that adapt the blood flow to the patient’s moves, the report said.

App, device clicks selfie to monitor cholesterol

 App, device clicks selfie to monitor cholesterol

Scientists at Cornell University  have developed a new device which enables your smartphone’s camera to read your cholesterol level instantly – by clicking a selfie.

The gadget eliminates the need for clumsy, complicated, home cholesterol-testing devices.

Cornell University engineers claim the Smartphone Cholesterol Application for Rapid Diagnostics, or “smartCARD,” could save lives – by reading out cholesterol level in about a minute.

 

app
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First bionic hand that can feel

First bionic hand that can feel

The first bionic hand that allows an amputee to feel what they are touching will be transplanted later this year that could introduce a new generation of artificial limbs with sensory perception.

The wiring of his new bionic hand will be connected to the patient’s nervous system via electrodes clipped onto two of the arm’s main nerves, the median and the ulnar nerves.

bionic han
With this the man will be able to control the movements of the hand as well as receiving touch signals from the hand’s skin sensors.

 

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