App, device clicks selfie to monitor cholesterol

 App, device clicks selfie to monitor cholesterol

Scientists at Cornell University  have developed a new device which enables your smartphone’s camera to read your cholesterol level instantly – by clicking a selfie.

The gadget eliminates the need for clumsy, complicated, home cholesterol-testing devices.

Cornell University engineers claim the Smartphone Cholesterol Application for Rapid Diagnostics, or “smartCARD,” could save lives – by reading out cholesterol level in about a minute.

 

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When a user puts a drop of blood on the cholesterol test strip, it processes the blood through separation steps and chemical reactions.

The strip is then ready for colorimetric analysis by the smartphone application.

The smartphone accessory checks the cholesterol levels by detecting bio markers in the users sweat, blood or a drop of blood and comes with a compatible smartphone app. The application then checks the results based on colour analysis, according to the researchers.

The smartCARD accessory – which looks somewhat like a smartphone credit card reader – clamps over the phone’s camera.

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Its built-in flash provides uniform, diffused light to illuminate the test strip that fits into the smartCARD reader.

 

The application in the phone calibrates the hue saturation to the image’s colour values on the cholesterol test strip, and the results appear on your phone.

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Currently, the test measures total cholesterol. The Erickson lab is working to break out those numbers in LDL (“bad” cholesterol), HDL (“good” cholesterol) and triglyceride measurements.

 

David Erickson, Cornell associate professor of mechanical engineering, tests the smartCARD, which uses an application system to read cholesterol levels in about a minute.

David Erickson, Cornell associate professor of mechanical engineering, tests the smartCARD, which uses an application system to read cholesterol levels in about a minute.

The lab is also working on detecting vitamin D levels, and has previously demonstrated smartphone tests for periodontitis and sweat electrolyte levels.